Remington Model RP9

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Remington introduces the Model RP9, a full-size polymer-framed handgun. The RP9 features a double-stack magazine, with a capacity of 18 rounds, and a number of accuracy and control enhancements — such as an ambidextrous slide lock, optimized grip angle to reduce felt recoil, a triggerguard undercut and ergonomic polymer frame. It’s chambered in 9mm+P and has a 4.5-inch barrel. A restricted-capacity model with 10-round magazines is also available.

http://www.shootingindustry.com/company/remington-arms-co-llc/

Streamlight Pistol-Grip Searchlight Models

Streamlight®, Inc., a leading provider of high-performance flashlights, significantly upgraded the lumen output of the Waypoint® Alkaline battery model and the Waypoint® Lithium Ion Rechargeable pistol-grip spotlights, while also enhancing both lights’ design. Handheld and powerful, the lights feature C4® LED technology to provide extremely bright lighting with an integrated long-range targeting beam.

The updated Waypoint Alkaline now features 550 lumens, 100,000 candela and a beam distance of 625 meters on the high setting. The Waypoint Rechargeable now delivers 1,000 lumens, 115,000 candela and a beam distance of 678 meters on high. The Waypoint Rechargable also has been redesigned to include a Medium setting, while the updated Waypoint Alkaline model adds a trigger style switch that allows for momentary light up capability without clicking the switch to lock the light on. Both lights feature an integrated stand for hands-free scene lighting. The Waypoint rechargeable model also will float if dropped in water.

“Both of these models are ideal for boating, camping and other outdoor pursuits, as well as for a wide variety of search and rescue and other first responder applications,” said Streamlight Vice President, Sales and Marketing, Michael Dineen. “They’re rugged and dependable, and extremely bright whether used as a handheld mobile searchlight, or as a hands-free, stationary light to illuminate a scene.”

The Waypoint Alkaline, when powered by four “C” alkaline batteries, delivers 10 hours of run time on high, 82 hours on both low and emergency signal mode, and unlimited run time when using its included 12-volt DC power cord. The Waypoint Rechargeable uses a Lithium Ion battery that is rechargeable up to 800 times. It offers 3 hours of run time on high, 6 hours on medium and 80 hours on low. Both lights feature a C4 LED that is impervious to shock, and use a deep-dish parabolic reflector to produce a long-range targeting beam while also optimizing peripheral illumination. The lights have cushioned handle grips to eliminate user hand fatigue, as well as a removable high-strength wrist lanyard.

Featuring a high-impact polycarbonate housing, the Waypoint Alkaline weighs 1.8 pounds, while the Waypoint Rechargeable weighs 1.52 pounds. Both measure 6.75 inches long by 7.14 inches high. The Waypoint Alkaline features an IPX4 rated design for water-resistant operation, while the Waypoint Rechargeable has an IPX8 rated design for waterproof operation to two meters. Both are impact resistance-tested to one meter and are available in black and yellow.

The MSRPs for the updated Waypoint Alkaline and Waypoint Rechargeable are $102.00 and $204.00, respectively. Both feature Streamlight’s Limited Lifetime Warranty.

Adjusting To Sales Under A Pro-Gun President

By Massad Ayoob

Nearly six months into President Trump’s term, the industry is still finding its way adjusting to the “new normal.” Prior to Election Day 2016, almost all the talking heads predicted a sweeping Hillary Clinton victory — but as we all now know, voters had something else in mind. With Trump’s victory and a continued Republican-controlled Congress, Washington, D.C. (and many states) experienced a pro-gun sweep for the most part.

As relief swept the gun culture and the gun owners’ civil rights community, pro-gun activists like Miguel Gonzalez at www.gunfreezone.net encouraged us all to sip a well-deserved cup of schadenfreude. That tasty satisfaction at the defeat of one’s enemies still delights, but NRA-ILA and others (including Gonzalez) have wisely encouraged us all to press our advantage for more pro-gun victories — and to welcome new customers to the industry.

But something else has happened. The desperate “last chance” need to buy desirable semi-auto firearms for personal- and home-defense has seen its driving force soften in recent months. Across the country, sales of such guns, notably centerfire MSRs, have decreased.

I chatted with one gun shop owner who sighed, “I had stocked up on dozens and dozens of black rifles. It looks as if they’re going to stay in the vault for a lot longer than I thought. I don’t care, though. This is a whole lot better than what we would have faced in the long run if Hillary Clinton had been elected and allowed to pack the Supreme Court with people who shared her agenda.”

His opinion seemed to be shared by most of the gun retailers I spoke with at the SHOT Show in January 2017.

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Beretta APX

Impact On Suppressors

The “gun owner schadenfreude-to-complacency” factor has struck in the suppressor market. Sales of NFA firearms and gear had been accelerating greatly prior to the November 2016 election — like short-barrel rifles (SBRs) and especially, sound suppressors. Since then, many dealers who work in this area have told me sales are down. A large part of it seems to be the belief the Hearing Protection Act (H.R.367) currently awaiting action in Washington, D.C., making silencers legal for sale over the counter without BATFE paperwork, would save the $200 licensing fee and through economy of scale, make the suppressors themselves cheaper.

The “legalization” of suppressors is by no means a done deal. Nonetheless, in a classic case of “perception is the reality,” a pro-gun president turns out to hurt gun dealers in yet another way. Irony abounds.

PD1

SilencerCo Maxim 9

A Silver Lining

There is, however, a silver lining to this ominous cloud. Almost immediately after the election, I spoke with Roy Huntington, editor of Shooting Industry’s sister magazine, American Handgunner. Roy predicted sales of MSRs would decrease once the threat of Hillary evaporated, but sales of recreational firearms (“fun guns,” if you will) would increase — like sporting handguns, .22s, etc. Let’s call it the “Huntington Hypothesis.”

My travels around the country talking with gun dealers have largely confirmed Huntington’s observation. Folks who like guns — especially those in their “peak earning years” and “comfortable retirement years” — seem to be reallocating their gun buying budgets instead of closing them out.

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S&W Performance Center Model G42

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Tactical Solutions X-Ring Takedown .22 LR

Case In Point: Revolvers

Ernie Traugh runs Cedar Valley Outfitters, a busy gun shop in Marion, Iowa. He has noted a profound drop-off in sales of the usual bread-and-butter guns — MSRs and high-capacity, polymer-frame pistols. However, when I asked him about the “Huntington Hypothesis,” Ernie answered, “It’s absolutely true. Revolvers are a good example. Since the election, I’ve been selling more revolvers in a month than we used to sell in six months.”

In a recent Women & Guns article titled “Revolvers Making ‘Comeback’ … Again,” long-time gun scene observer Dave Workman wrote, “Handgun popularity is cyclic, and according to some people attending this year’s SHOT Show, the cycle has started turning back toward revolvers. One probably cannot explain why handgun popularity runs in cycles, but it does. That’s why revolvers may go out of vogue, but they never go out of service. So long as there is a need for defensive sidearms, there will be a place for the revolver.”

I stop in regularly at the Pro Arms Gun Shop in Live Oak, Fla. Lately I’ve seen more hunting/sporting rifles on the racks than ever before in this establishment, since it has focused primarily on defensive firearms. There are noticeably more .22s, from junior-size Crickett rifles to the increasingly popular S&W M&P clone of the MSR chambered in .22 LR — instead of the usual .223, .300 Blackout or .308.

The fine old Smith & Wesson revolvers and similar classics that once gathered dust in the used handgun showcase have all but disappeared. Pro Arms is not the only shop seeing this phenomenon. At the online gun forum, www.pistol-forum.com, one serious shooter from Dayton, Ohio recently wrote: “Today I decided to go gun shop hopping. I’m looking for a couple different K-Frames, so I decided to see if I could get lucky. I went to nine different shops of various sizes. Most I hadn’t been to before. Nine different shops full of almost nothing but soulless plastic bullet pushers.” Why? Maybe … revolvers are selling again.

Bottom line? The market has normalized after periods of panic buying. What’s going down in some sectors is going up in others. And, with what would have been the most anti-gun president in American history not at the helm, the retail firearms industry has won in the long run.

Ernie Traugh runs Cedar Valley Outfitters, a busy gun shop in Marion, Iowa. He has noted a profound drop-off in sales of the usual bread-and-butter guns — MSRs and high-capacity, polymer-frame pistols. However, when I asked him about the “Huntington Hypothesis,” Ernie answered, “It’s absolutely true. Revolvers are a good example. Since the election, I’ve been selling more revolvers in a month than we used to sell in six months.”

In a recent Women & Guns article titled “Revolvers Making ‘Comeback’ … Again,” long-time gun scene observer Dave Workman wrote, “Handgun popularity is cyclic, and according to some people attending this year’s SHOT Show, the cycle has started turning back toward revolvers. One probably cannot explain why handgun popularity runs in cycles, but it does. That’s why revolvers may go out of vogue, but they never go out of service. So long as there is a need for defensive sidearms, there will be a place for the revolver.”

I stop in regularly at the Pro Arms Gun Shop in Live Oak, Fla. Lately I’ve seen more hunting/sporting rifles on the racks than ever before in this establishment, since it has focused primarily on defensive firearms. There are noticeably more .22s, from junior-size Crickett rifles to the increasingly popular S&W M&P clone of the MSR chambered in .22 LR — instead of the usual .223, .300 Blackout or .308.

The fine old Smith & Wesson revolvers and similar classics that once gathered dust in the used handgun showcase have all but disappeared. Pro Arms is not the only shop seeing this phenomenon. At the online gun forum, www.pistol-forum.com, one serious shooter from Dayton, Ohio recently wrote: “Today I decided to go gun shop hopping. I’m looking for a couple different K-Frames, so I decided to see if I could get lucky. I went to nine different shops of various sizes. Most I hadn’t been to before. Nine different shops full of almost nothing but soulless plastic bullet pushers.” Why? Maybe … revolvers are selling again.

Bottom line? The market has normalized after periods of panic buying. What’s going down in some sectors is going up in others. And, with what would have been the most anti-gun president in American history not at the helm, the retail firearms industry has won in the long run.

Read More Personal Defense Articles

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Women Continue To Impact The Industry

(And They’re Not Done Yet)

By Shari LeGate

The first time I walked on to a shooting range, it was a little scary and intimating. I called the previous week asking about lessons and booked a time. When I showed up, I expected a formal lesson — like you’d have in golf or tennis. Walking into the doublewide trailer, which served as the clubhouse, I checked in. The man behind the counter took my money, tied a builder’s apron around my waist, filled it with 20-gauge shotshells, stuffed cotton in my ears, handed me a beat-up old Remington 1100, pointed to a group of old men on the skeet range and said, “just walk out there, they’ll show you how to shoot,” and I did. That was my introduction to the shooting sports in the late ’80s. Thankfully times have changed.

Today, women are a common sight at shooting ranges, gun stores and competition events — and their numbers continue to grow. A report recently released by the National Association of Sporting Goods Wholesalers (NASGW), using up to 15 years’ worth of NASGW survey data, shows women’s participation has outpaced male activity in almost every category. Women’s involvement in target shooting increased 64.1 percent overall from 2001 to 2015. In the same timeframe, women’s participation in handgun shooting surged by 96.3 percent. Rifle target shooting climbed by 58.5 percent — well over the male participation increase of 35.3 percent.

The women’s snapshot doesn’t stop there. In 2013, Pew Research Center conducted a survey and found there was a substantial gender gap in gun ownership. Men were three times as likely to purchase a gun as women: 37 percent versus 12 percent. Just two years later in 2015, 78 percent of retailers who responded to survey questions said they experienced an upswing in women customers. Additionally, the way women entered the shooting industry saw a change. “Interest in the shooting sports” and a “desire for personal protection” were the most common reasons.

Not Just Pink

When this new consumer base first showed up, the shooting sports industry scrambled to provide products to fill their needs. Manufacturers stepped up and truly wanted to reach the women’s market, but some missteps were made. When the ladies/youth shotgun model first debuted, women often thought: “Thanks for letting us know we have the body of a 16-year-old boy.” Next came the colored guns. The pinks, purples and light blues. Clothing was another challenge. Whether it was a shooting vest, camouflage gear or hunting attire, women were offered a downsized men’s version.

However as more women entered the shooting community, their voices grew louder and their influence became stronger. They wanted products designed for them, not products merely rebranded. Manufacturers, retailers and the industry as a whole responded, with new product designs, dedicated shelf space in retail stores and programs for shooting ranges with the purpose and intent of reaching out to women with a welcoming hand.

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Photo by Howard Communications

Paving The Way Forward

Within any industry, evaluating the environment and current trends is just good business and the shooting sports is no different. Turning a critical eye on the direction and progression an industry is taking can show what areas are growing and what needs the most attention. Recently, the NSSF reported new target shooters (those who have taken up the sport in the last five years) are younger, female and urban compared to “established” target shooters — those participating for more than five years.

Women have made, and are still making, a substantial impact in the shooting sports industry. There are women in leadership positions of major organizations, they’re forming and building industry-related companies and they’re rising in the ranks of the competitive shooting arena. Women have moved from being a shadow in the background to making decisions affecting strategic plans, marketing campaigns and adding their input to research and development of new products. But this doesn’t mean reaching out to women or their role influencing the industry is finished.

The buzzwords of today are “diversity” and “inclusion.” And for the longest time, this was meant for the women’s market. Not anymore. Now the phrase “diversity and inclusion” paints a much broader stroke, referring not just to gender, but also to race, color, sexual identity, religion and culture.

With this new outreach, the role of women in the industry plays an even more important part than ever before. The path women forged for acceptance, involvement and relevancy in an industry that wasn’t always welcoming can be used as a roadmap in reaching out to this new customer base. Women have paved the way by opening doors, breaking down barriers and using their influence to challenge an industry to think outside the box.

An Ongoing Conversation

So, what does the future hold for the women in the industry now? If you look at the statistics and trends, it would be easy to say women’s growth will continue at a substantial rate — but there’s more to it than just the numbers.

Leaha Wirth, vice president of sales and marketing for HIVIZ shares it’s about staying relevant. “It’s up to us now. We can’t just sit on our laurels and expect to be handed things. We have to continue working hard to know everything there is to possibly know about the guns we use, their applications and the sports we participate in. It makes us a better asset to our industry and it’s an incentive for the industry to devote more resources to the female market,” she said.

As consumers and business owners, it’s important women keep reaching out and mentoring others. As more women and diversified groups enter the shooting sports, women know well the obstacles ahead and can offer guidance and assurance making the road easier to travel.

Recognizing the contributions women have made to the industry and how they’ve helped shape it is an ongoing conversation. A tremendous opportunity lies ahead for women and for the industry. One, if taken advantage of, can only increase participation numbers on all fronts.

For those of you who may recall, an old, well-known marketing campaign that targeted women once stated, “you’ve come a long way” and we have … but we’re not done yet.

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Hunting Season Showcase

Are you ready to outfit your hunting customers this fall?

The products featured here may include the next “must have” you’ll
want to stock for this year’s hunting season!

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Barrett Firearms

Fieldcraft Rifle

The Fieldcraft rifle is designed to be carried further on long days in the field and perform like a Barrett at that critical moment. The stock is crafted from carbon fiber to provide an ultralight, yet stiff platform for shooting from field positions. The actions are scaled for their specific caliber and precision barrels contoured for their application. MSRP $1,799. barrett.net

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Cold Steel

Cheap Shot Broadheads

Imagine a broadhead that flies like a dart and strikes with the lethality of steel for less than a dollar apiece! Introducing Cold Steel’s Cheap Shot — an extremely accurate and effective non-steel broadhead. Available in 100 and 125 grain weights, Cold Steel’s Cheap Shot broadheads are packaged in 10 pack ($12.99 MSRP) or 50 pack ($39.99 MSRP) quantities. Contact: Sales@nullColdSteel.com coldsteel.com

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LOCKEDON 360°

LockedOn 360° Mobile Gun Vise

LockedOn 360° Mobile Gun Vise is the vise for seasoned hunters, youth and physically challenged shooters — allowing controlled movement for better shot placement. By reducing recoil, the vise allows safe and easy introduction to hunting for youth and the physically challenged. The seasoned hunter will appreciate the stability and range of motion it offers for those challenging shots. lockedon360.com

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Jagemann Sporting Group

Jagemann Rifle Brass

Jagemann Rifle Brass is now available in the following calibers: 300 Blackout, .223 Rem., 5.56x45mm, 7mm Rem. Mag., .300 Win. Mag. and 6.5 Creedmoor. Additional variants in launch development as well! Contact info@nulljagemannsportinggroup.com for current delivery status.
jagemannsportinggroup.com

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Buffalo Bore Ammunition

Outdoorsman Line

Buffalo Bore’s Outdoorsman Line was developed for those who choose to use a carry pistol or home defense pistol while hiking, fishing or camping. The Hard Cast Flat Nose bullet is designed for deep, straight line penetration and does considerable terminal damage while crushing through bone and tissue. Now the typical carry pistol can be effective on bears and other large wild animals. buffalobore.com

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Cold Steel

Finn Wolf

The Cold Steel Finn Wolf is a folding utility and camp knife that draws inspiration from the classic Finnish Puukko. Equipped with Cold Steel’s famed Tri-Ad® lock, it can be relied on in any situation. Its zero ground edge is simple to resharpen in the field. Features 3 1/2″ of AUS8A steel & Griv-Ex handles, available in four colors. MSRP: $64.99 Contact: Sales@nullcoldsteel.com. coldsteel.com

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Breakthrough® Clean

Long Gun Operator’s Cleaning Kit

Breakthrough® Clean’s custom-designed Long Gun Operator’s Cleaning Kit – Universal (LOC-U) has all the components necessary to effectively clean and maintain your firearms ranging from .22-caliber through 12-ga. Packed into a lightweight Velcro case with MOLLE backing are: 2 oz. bottle of Breakthrough® Military-Grade Solvent; 2 oz. bottle of Battle Born High-Purity Oil; one 12cc syringe of Batte Born Grease fortified with PTFE; five rod sections with a 37″ combined working length; polymer t-handle; double end nylon utility brush; six nylon bore brushes (various caliber sizes); shotgun rod adapter; brass shotgun patch holder; two brass patch holders (.22/.223 cal. and .30 cal.); cleaning patches; and a silicone cloth. Breakthrough® Clean — The Difference is Clear™.
breakthroughclean.com

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Bottle Breacher

.50 Caliber Bottle Breacher

Breach your next cold one in style with our .50 Caliber Bottle Breacher made by Veterans in the USA. This Vintage Breacher comes in a box and is either plain or engraved with a deer — perfect for anyone who loves a good time. Join us in our mission to give back to Veteran and Military Non-profits. #BreacherUp. Bottle Breacher contact: Colson Cripps, colson@nullbottlebreacher.com. bottlebreacher.com

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Andy’s Leather

Rhodesian Rifle Sling

The Rhodesian Rifle Sling is both a shooting aid, that supports the shooter when slung, and a carry strap. The slings are made with bridle leather and solid brass hardware in North Carolina. Swivels are available and sold separately. Andy’s Leather also makes standard carry straps and other accessories. Dealer/Distributor discounts are available (when Andy’s not in the shop he runs www.scoutrifle.org and is editor of www.scoutriflemagazine.com).
andysleather.com

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Charles Daly

Triple Barrel Shotguns

Charles Daly® Triple Barrel shotguns are made with the same quality and attention to detail as any of the finest over/under shotguns. Available in 12-ga., 20-ga., 28-ga. and .410. All models use the Rem® choke thread pattern allowing the shooter to have multiple pattern options. The Charles Daly® Triple Crown Compact version shown is a ladies model. charlesdaly.com

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Zeiss Sports Optics

Conquest V6 Riflescope

ZEISS announces the new Conquest V6 riflescope line. The Conquest V6 features a superior 6X variable magnification range, new ballistic turrets and new ballistic reticles ZBR and ZMOA, all in a compact SuperZoom 30mm riflescope. The new V6 utilizes FL lenses and T* lens coatings to achieve an unsurpassed in its class light transmission of 92 percent. zeiss.com

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DECIBULLZ

Custom Molded Percussive Filters

New Decibullz Custom Molded Percussive Filters feature our top-rated DIY Thermo-fit molded earpieces combined with percussive filter technology. The filters protect users from the peak sound pressure of gunshots, artillery fire and explosions, suppressing them to safe levels and protecting users from potential long-term hearing damage. Sound when you want it. Protection when you need it.
decibullz.com

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Challenges, Yes. But Signs Point To Sales Improving

By Russ Thurman

The industry received a bit of good news in early April when the March NICS background checks were announced. The FBI system conducted 1,356,929 (NSSF-adjusted) background checks in March, a 5.2 percent increase over March 2016.

While the increase may not impress some, it’s a welcome shift from the declines of the first two months of the year. In January and February there were decreases of 23.8 and 12.7 percent, respectively, in NICS checks compared to the same months in 2016.

The number of March background checks was also the second highest for the month in the history of NICS; a record 1,501,730 background checks were conducted in March 2013.

During this year’s first quarter, NICS conducted 3,693,502 (NSSF-adjusted) background checks. While that’s a 10.78 percent drop from 2016, it’s a 4.89 percent increase over 2015. Given this year’s steep downturn, most in the industry would happily embrace 2015 business numbers.

Moving Inventory

To boost sales, businesses throughout the industry are making deals. It’s clearly a consumer’s market. Deep discounts, price cuts and generous promotions — some by companies that rarely promote — are helping to move inventory and jumpstart a recovery.

Smith & Wesson’s “Savings You Can Carry” mail-in rebate for consumers began in April, and runs through this month. Consumers can receive a $75 rebate on the purchase of a new M&P Shield, $50 back on a new M&P Bodyguard 380 and $25 back on a new S&W SD or SDVE.

Winchester Repeating Arms gave consumers a $25 rebate on the purchase of a new Super X Pump Turkey shotgun, and the company’s Tax Break promotion during April earned consumers an 8 percent refund to cover state tax on the purchase of a new Winchester firearm. Browning upped the tax-related refund to 10 percent on the purchase of a new Browning firearm during April.

During March and April, Beretta gave consumers a $75 rebate on the purchase of select models of the Px4 Storm.
In early April, Colt announced a $50 price cut for Colt Competition Pistols.

The push to move inventory is having an impact.

“Smith & Wesson is clearly the leader in handgun sales,” said Michael Halleron, former Chattanooga Shooting Supplies VP of business development. “They are much more aggressive than last year with their dealer packages and consumer rebates.”

Halleron says dealers who are promoting are also doing well.

“We participated in a few dealer promos recently, and one store sold 400 guns in one day. The other sold 2,000 guns in two days through their multi-retail channel approach. And the third sold 200 guns in two days. It appears, if you’re promoting, the sales are there,” Halleron said.

Overall, sales are improving.

“Concealed handguns continue to move well. MSRs, as a category, are doing better, as well as accessories. Optics are doing exceptional for us, especially in the last few months, from the high-dollar down to entry-level models,” Halleron said.

Staying The Course

Obviously, even with March’s improved NICS numbers, it’s too early to declare the slowdown over. Publicly traded companies, as of mid-April, are yet to see their stocks reach November’s pre-election levels. Stock prices are improving — American Outdoor Brands and Ruger enjoyed an increase in the March NICS announcement — but it hasn’t been easy. In addition, there have been hundreds of layoffs throughout the industry, expansion plans have been put on hold and companies have slashed sponsorship and advertising programs.

That said, it’s encouraging to know consumers are still purchasing firearms. This is vital. Unclogging the overstocked distribution pipeline is key to the industry posting a profit, even as it struggles to discover the new business normal.

Also important to business today: firearms and the industry are viewed more favorably than they were during the Obama years. While the anti-gun coalition is still in full-screech, it’s not receiving the fondling media coverage of the near past. Plus, there has been a notable increase in gun ownership, a significant segment of whom are young, urban and women. And one additional key element: The industry is well respected, thanks in great part to NSSF.

Yes, there are plenty of challenges ahead, including the possibility of a real summer slump. However, long-term success is built on staying the course during difficult times, mixed with a heavy dose of business grit.

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